Sociology

Sociology

      Difference makers wanted

      We are looking for students who care about the world around them and want to make it a better place, particularly for the poor and marginalized.  That is why we offer a social justice focus as part of our sociology major here at Crandall University.  Come work with professors who are concerned about the problems in society and who will think with you about creative solutions to those problems. If you want to make a difference, we think you need to understand society in order to help improve it.  That’s why you should study sociology.  Learning more about the dynamics of human relationships helps you form better relationships.  Understanding society’s major institutions (like education, marriage, or religion) helps you understand how you can best transform them.  Understanding globalization, patterns of immigration, and relationships between rich and poor countries, empowers you to work towards world justice.   With courses in poverty, world population, marriage and the family, gender, religion, and many others, we explore the diversity of our social world.   And, it is not only classroom work that creates difference makers.  We invite you to be involved in our community and beyond.  You can volunteer with a local organization, or go overseas on a missions/development trip as part of our internship programs.  Join the Sociology Society and participate in a food drive or other service opportunities.  People are hurting in this broken world.  Since we care about people, we are looking for difference makers.

      Special Program Highlights for a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Sociology

      • Develop strong relationships with professors who seek to empower students to connect with their communities and make a difference for the good.
      • Undertake an internship during your degree in Sociology – work in community organizations such as youth centers, mental health homes, homeless shelters or even arrange for an overseas internship experience.
      • Join the Sociology Society that arranges fun group activities as well as providing service to food banks, missions, and groups like Big Brothers and Big  Sisters.
      • Learn to think and live in new ways that are sensitive to our increasingly culturally and socially diverse world.
      • By focusing on courses like Perspective on Poverty, Population and World Hunger, and Globalization and Current Social Issues, you can add a “social justice concentration” to your sociology degree.

      Meet Your Instructors

      Professors seek to empower students to connect with their communities and make a difference for good.

      • Dr. Sam Reimer grew up in Japan where he first became interested in Sociology. He holds a PhD from the renowned University of Notre Dame in Indiana. He has researched extensively on the sociology of religion and Canada/US comparisons.
      • Dr. Gary LeBlanc teaches courses focused on marriage and family, social problems and domestic violence.
      • Dr. Adam Stewart was born and raised in Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia.  His Ph.D. is from the University of Waterloo, and he also has an MLIS degree from Western University.  Before coming to Crandall, Adam worked as a pastor, librarian, archivist, library designer, and library director, and also taught at Wilfrid Laurier University and the University of Waterloo.
      • Dr. Seth Crowell is a born and bred Maritimer and became fascinated with Sociology his very first year of university. His doctorate research focused on how university students’ significant others help contribute to their undergraduate success. One of his favourite places to be is in the classroom trying to both challenge and encourage his students.

      Professors

      Seth Crowell, Ph.D.

      Senior Lecturer of Organizational Management & Sociology

      Contact Seth

      Sam Reimer, Ph.D.

      Professor of Sociology - Dept. Coordinator

      Contact Sam

      Carol Thorne, Dr. d’état

      Part-time Lecturer of Cultural Anthropolgy

      Contact Carol

      Adam Stewart, Ph.D.

      Assistant Professor of Sociology

      Career Outlook for Sociology Majors

      A degree in Sociology is an excellent liberal arts foundation that prepares you well for any number of career directions and graduate studies. Past graduates have gone on to careers in education, ministry, social services, corrections and international relations.

      Sound interesting?

      Call Toll Free1-888-968-6228 for more information
      or email us at admissions@crandallu.ca

      Courses and Requirements

      Perspectives on Poverty – Students are introduced to current research and theory on poverty, the interplay between structural and personal causes of poverty and the personal experience of poverty in Canada. The course examines the multiple systems that intersect with poverty including family, school, health care and criminal justice. Assumptions about social problems are challenged.

      Deviant Behavior – Explore the various forms of behavior that are considered deviant in society. A particular emphasis is placed on how sociology attempts to explain and understand these behaviors.

      Modern Life and Personal Identity – Discover how personal family history and modern Canadian culture shape an understanding of personal identity. The course familiarizes students with larger social trends in the last century in the West and helps them discover how these trends have influenced family history and them personally.

      The B.A. in Sociology is designed to give students a solid understanding of the social human experience.  The degree will provide opportunities for study in the major areas of Sociology with a strong theoretical and methodological component.  Graduates from this degree program could continue on in Sociology or enter other fields of study such as law, education, ministry, politics, criminology, or social work.

      Major – 39 credit hours in Sociology including 1013, 1023, 3013, 3023, 3603, 4613, one additional 4000 level course, plus six further courses, at least two of which must be at the 3000-4000 level.  In addition, students majoring in Sociology must take the following cognate courses:  MT1203, 1233.

      Honours – 54 credit hours in Sociology including 1013, 1023, 3013, 3023, 3603, 4613, and 4996, plus ten further courses in Sociology including at least two at the 4000 level.  In addition, those doing Honours in Sociology must take MT1203 and 1233 as cognate requirements.  A CGPA of 3.00 for the degree is required.  No mark below C- can be credited toward the degree and no mark below B- can be credited toward the major.  Admission to Honours takes place during the second semester of the third year and consists of having the thesis application approved by the Research and Ethics Committee.

      Sociology 1013 – Introduction to Sociology I

      This course provides a general survey into the terminology, principles, and human experience in social life, as well as an examination of such aspects as the sociological imagination, culture, socialization, social inequality, social institutions, deviance and crime, and other areas related to the structure of contemporary society.

      Sociology 1023 – Introduction to Sociology II

      This course is a continuation of Sociology 1013.

      Sociology 2133 – Cultural Anthropology

      This course looks at similarities and differences among cultures; their social and economic characteristics; their customs, traditions, and beliefs.

      Sociology 2143 – Life Cycle and Kinship

      This course is a continuation of the study of cultural anthropology with a focus on the study of kinship systems, marriage customs, gender roles, and life cycle stages in various cultures around the world.

      Sociology 2213 – Marriage and Family

      This course involves an examination of marriage and family patterns, and family structures, and functions, within North America and elsewhere, in an attempt to understand how these patterns are maintained, adapted, and changed.

      Sociology 2313 – Population and World Hunger

      This course is a social demography course with particular attention to global poverty.  Besides learning the basics of population research, the student will wrestle with key global issues of our time.

      Sociology 3013 – Sociological Theory I

      This course provides an overview of the classical theorists central to the development of sociology.  It examines major sociological concepts, as well as the social milieu from which they originated.

      Prerequisites: Sociology 1013, 1023.

      Sociology 3023 – Sociological Theory II

      This course explores the major paradigms of contemporary sociological theory and the prominent theorists contributing to the development of each.

      Prerequisite:  Sociology 3013.

      Sociology 3033* – Sociology of Education

      This course examines theories and research in the sociology of education, the school as a formal and informal organization, and the effects of education on stratification, social control, race, class, and gender.

      Prerequisites:  Sociology 1013, 1023.

      Sociology 3043* – Perspectives on Poverty

      This course introduces students to current research and theory on poverty, the interplay between structural and personal causes of poverty, and the personal experience of poverty in Canada.  The multiple systems that intersect with poverty, including family, school, health care, and criminal justice, are examined: previous and current assumptions about this social problem are challenged.  While the primary focus will be on Canadian poverty, there is a cursory study of global perspectives.

      Prerequisites: Sociology 1013, 1023.

      Sociology 3103 – Socialization

      This course examines how people learn to conform to human society.  The human development process is studied, noting the major theoretical perspectives which attempt to explain the process and the major agents which accomplish human socialization.

      Prerequisites: Sociology 1013, 1023.

      Sociology 3143 – Social Movements

      Social movements are integral to societal change and this course provides students with the insights and analytical skill for analyzing the origins, consequences, and decline or renewal of such movements. Students will survey various examples of social movement including issues pertaining to race, gender, peace, class, and the environment. Both classical and contemporary sociological theories will be used to explain the realities regarding social movements and social change.

      Sociology 3153 – Globalization and Current Social Issues

      Todays world seems much smaller, world travel is increasingly common, communication around the globe is instantaneous, and economic or political shifts in one region of the earth often have global influences.  This course looks at the concept of globalization and its implications, and it will ask what it means and whether or not it is good or bad for the planet and its inhabitants.

      Prerequisites: Sociology 1013, 1023.

      Sociology 3213 – Modern Life and Personal Identity

      This course attempts to discover how personal family history and modern Canadian culture shape an understanding of personal identity.  This course will familiarizes students with larger social trends in the last century in the West and will help them to discover how these trends have influenced family history and them personally.

      Prerequisites: Sociology 1013, 1023.

      Sociology 3223 – Deviant Behaviour

      This course looks at various forms of behaviour that are considered deviant in society.  A particular emphasis is  on how sociology attempts to explain and understand these behaviours.

      Prerequisites:  Sociology 1013, 1023.

      Sociology 3353 – Pluralism and Civic Responsibility in Canada

      This course helps students understand the opportunities, privileges and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship in the 21stcentury.  Insofar as Canada is intentionally and consitutionally a multi-cultural society, we examine the impact of cultural, economic, and religious pluralism on the social fabric of our country.  Students are expected, by the end of the course, to articulate and defend a response to the challenges of civic responsibility which is consistent with their faith beliefs (whatever these may be).

      Prerequisites:  Sociology 1013, 1023.

      Sociology 3413 – Social Problems

      This course seeks to acquaint students with the social problems and issues prevalent within the institutions and societal groupings of the contemporary world, as well as their implications.  Students are also acquainted with some proposed solutions.

      Prerequisites: Sociology 1013, 1023.

      Sociology 3513, 3523 – Directed Studies in Sociology

      These courses are available for students when their interests and the professors’ expertise allow for a more in-depth tutorial approach.  Students must be highly capable and must have completed upper level prerequisite courses in the area of the directed study.

      Prerequisite: Permission of the Registrar and Professor.

      Sociology 3603* – Research Methods in the Social Sciences

      In this course, students become acquainted with the methods and procedures used in identifying research problems, forming hypotheses, and gathering and analyzing data.  Emphasis is placed on students’ abilities to interpret and critically analyze research reports that appear in professional journals and other publications.

      Prerequisites:  Sociology 1013, 1023.

      Sociology 3643 – Gender Studies

      This course examines gender and gender relations in Canada through a broad range of gender-related topics.  Students will be introduced to the idea of gender as a social construction that is both diverse and dynamic, and as it thus affects behaviour, beliefs, attitudes, and the interpersonal relationships of women and men throughout their lives. Theory, core concepts, and controversial issues on several themes are reviewed.

      Prerequisites:  Sociology 1013, 1023.

      Sociology 3753 – Sociology of Sport

      Sport has made an enduring impact on the world in which we all live and interact.  As a result, it can often be a taken for granted component within our everyday lives. At the same time there is more to sport than just what we see on a daily basis. The intent of this course is to apply a sociological lens to the world of sports and athletics through the utilization of academic writing, popular media, as well as with personal experiences and strategic observations. In essence, this course is the study of the structural and cultural relationship of sport to society and vice versa.

      Sociology 3823* – Sociology of Religion

      This course examines the major issues and trends in contemporary religion from the perspective of the social sciences.  Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of religion in Canada.

      Prerequisites: Sociology 1013, 1023.

      Sociology 3833 – Sociology of Work

      This course examines work in the modern society.  While some consideration is given to an historical evolution of work and to impact on the individual, more emphasis is placed on the social organization of work, work settings, problems in the workplace, and the meaning of work in the lives of individuals.

      Prerequisites:  Sociology 1013, 1023.

      Sociology 3943 – Indigenous Peoples and Issues in Canada

      This course examines the interplay between Indigenous histories, cultures and contemporary issues in the Canadian context, with special emphasis on the theme of reconciliation. It also questions the very way in which we frame these histories, cultures and issues. Why “Indigenous peoples”? Why “in Canada”? What do these terms and paradigms mean or imply? How did we arrive at them? Why “Indigenous” issues? Are they not also Canadian issues? How are these issues perceived, and misperceived, in Indigenous and non-Indigenous contexts? How are Indigenous histories, cultures and issues shaped by, and drawn into, larger debates in Canadian and Western societies? What are some of the most important historical and contemporary obstacles to reconciling Indigenous and non-Indigenous cultures, historical understandings, and aspirations for the future? What can we draw from history and from Indigenous and non-Indigenous cultures in order to facilitate such reconciliation?

      Sociology 4213 – Selected Topics:  Family Violence

      This course is an in-depth analysis of the factors and consequences of violence within the social context of the family.

      Prerequisites:  Sociology 1013, 1023 plus six additional credit hours in Sociology.  Recommended:  Sociology 2213.

      Sociology 4513, 4523 – Advanced Directed Studies in Sociology

      These courses are available for students when their interests and the professors’ expertise allow for a more in-depth tutorial approach.  Students must be highly capable and must have completed upper level prerequisite courses in the area of the directed study.

      Prerequisite: Permission of the Registrar and Professor.

      Sociology 4613 – Advanced Research Methods in Sociology

      This course provides a brief review of methodology and statistical technique and then synthesizes these areas by applying them to research design.  Students learn to design and implement research projects in both quantitative and qualitative methodologies and to develop computer skills necessary for research.

      Prerequisites:  Sociology 3603 and Mathematics 1233.

      Sociology 4703* – Death and Grieving

      This course examines the human response of grief when faced with the loss of a loved one.  Issues regarding attachment theory, normal grief, complicated grief, as well as the means for alleviating pain associated with loss are considered.

      Prerequisites: Sociology 1013, 1023 plus six additional credit hours in Sociology.

      Sociology 4833* – Evangelicalism in Canada

      This course begins with the necessary task of defining evangelicalism.  It then examines  evangelicalism in contemporary Canada, primarily through the use of social theory and survey research.  The beliefs, practices, attitudes, and demographics of evangelicals, and the organizations that support the evangelical subculture are discussed.

      Prerequisite:  Sociology 3823.

      Sociology 4853 – Internship in Sociology

      The sociology internship involves at least eight hours of on-site/hands-on work per week over a semester, and in a placement area related to social services, demographics, education, corrections, polling, or research, for instance.  In addition, students are required to review the literature in their area of placement, to take thorough field notes of their experience, to write a research paper, to fulfill the professional requirements of the placement role, and to meet regularly with the professor.  This internship is open to third or fourth year sociology students in good standing by permission of the Registrar and Professor.  Admission is contingent on availability of placements.

      Prerequisites: Sociology 3013, 3023, 3603.

      Sociology 4863* – Cross-Cultural Internship

      This internship involves intensive interaction with another cultural/ethnic group, normally overseas.  It requires the keeping of thorough field notes, writing a literature review, writing a major paper, and a satisfactory completion of the requirements of the sponsoring group, as determined through consultation between the professor and the field supervisor.  Students can apply to go with a non-profit mission or relief organization, with a government agency, or a for-profit company, usually in the summer.

      Prerequisites: Sociology 2133, and any two of Sociology 2143, Interdisciplinary Studies/ Religious Studies 2873 or Communication Studies/Linguistics 2023.

      Sociology 4996 – Thesis

      Certain exceptional students, upon request prior to the completion of their third year, may be granted permission to write a thesis as a part of their Honours degree requirements.