History

History

      Explore Civilization’s Rich Past with a History Degree from Crandall

      Learning to ask the right questions, to think logically and express yourself clearly and succinctly are all hallmarks of Crandall’s history degree program.  The major encompasses the study of Western civilization and focuses on the rise of the West within the world context.  Through interesting guest speakers, lively class discussions and extensive readings, you’ll expand your understanding of humankind and your faith as it relates to other religions and world events, both past and current.  The skills gained through this challenging history degree curriculum will prepare you well for a broad range of career pathways, including graduate or law school.

      Special Program Highlights for a Bachelor of Arts in History

      • Get to know their professors and classmates well by being a part of small classes that engage in lively group discussions.
      • It’s not about memorizing dates with a history degree at Crandall! Explore the “why” and “how” behind historic events to give them context on the world stage.
      • Study history overseas at Oxford University for a semester, if you wish, exploring the settings of many events they study in their classes.
      • Gain exposure to Africa’s fascinating history in addition to studying the history of Western civilization.
      • Complete an internships for credit if you wish. Past students have worked in such locations as area museums and archives.
      • Explore different worldviews and learn to appreciate Christianity in new ways.
      • Learn from interesting guest speakers who visit classes from time to time, sharing their unique perspectives on world events.
      • Join the History Society, which offers fun opportunities to socialize with other History majors at barbecues, field trips and other gatherings.

      Meet Your Instructors

      • Professors teach every class and work closely with students to maximize their learning opportunities throughout their history degree.
      • History comes alive for students through interesting, engaging classes. Professors encourage students to take a “hands on” approach to history from the very first year.
      • History professors all hold a PhD in their fields of expertise, which include British History, American/Canadian History and African History.

      Professors

      Keith Grant, Ph.D.

      Assistant Professor of History

      Dennis Bustin, Ph.D.

      Associate Professor of History - Dept. Coordinator

      Contact Dennis

      Career Outlook for History Majors

      A history degree provides an excellent background for students who wish to become teachers, researchers, lawyers, politicians, journalists, ministers and heritage preservationists.  A major in History is an excellent springboard to graduate school or law school.

      Sound interesting?

      Call Toll Free1-888-968-6228 for more information
      or email us at admissions@crandallu.ca

      Courses and Requirements

      Introduction to the Study of African History – Explore the main phases of Africa’s history and development.  Get acquainted with Africa’s political and social organization and representation through the colonial period.

      The Reformation in Europe – Examine the development of Protestantism as a social, economic, political and religious reaction to the status quo of European society.

      Stuart England – This course focuses on selected topics and themes in late-Tudor and early-Stuart England. Topics include the political, social and religious context of the times and various interpretations of the period’s events. Students are encouraged to identify themes of personal interest for their major research paper.

      Modern Revolutions – Investigates various themes common to  several modern revolutions including the American, French and Russian revolutions.

      Autobiography and lite Writing – Presents autobiography and other forms of ‘lite writing’ as important sources for understanding individual experiences during the 19th century in English Canada.

      History helps to put humanity’s life and times into perspective.  Understanding the past is crucial for a sense of identity.  TheB.A. in History will explore the people, places and ideas of the past.  Students will learn specific life skills such as how to ask the right questions, how to find answers, how to think logically, and how to write and express oneself with precision and imagination.  The overarching purpose of the History program is to introduce students to the rise of the West within the world context and to introduce students to the symbiotic relationship among world cultures. History graduates will be oriented toward careers in teaching, research, law, politics, heritage preservation, journalism, and ministry.

      Major – 39 credit hours in History including 1113, 1123, 2413, 2223 or 2613, 2123 or 2833, 3013, 3023,  plus six further courses at least five of which must be at the 3000-4000 level; two of these five must be at the 4000 level.  In addition, one of these six courses must be in European history, one must be in North American history, and one must be in African history.

      Honours – 54 credit hours in History including 1113, 1123, 2413, 2223 or 2613, 2123 or 2833, 3013, 3023, and 4996 plus nine further courses in History including at least two at the 4000 level.  At least one of these nine courses must be in European history, at least one must be in North American history, and one in African history.  A CGPA of 3.00 for the degree is required.  No mark below C- can be credited toward the degree and no mark below B- can be credited toward the major.  Admission to Honours takes place during the second semester of the third year and consists of having the thesis application approved by the Research and Ethics Committee.

      History 1113 – World History I: Western Civilization in Global Context to 1600

      This course surveys history from ancient times to the seventeenth century. Topics covered include ideas, values, institutions, major events, and the spread of Christianity.

      History 1123 – World History II: Themes in Global History from 1600 to the Present

      This course considers the process of globalization from 1600 to the present with special attention to economic, religious, and geopolitical forces.

      History 2113 – Pre-Confederation Canada

      Beginning with the coming of the French in 1608, this study will trace the key social, political, and economic developments of colonial North America. The aim is to bring students to that point where there is a clear understanding of how and why the colonies became the country of Canada in 1867.

      History 2123 – Canada Since 1867

      Starting with the reality of Confederation in 1867, this study will examine the growing pains of diversity, and the progress of the young country of Canada. Through critical discussion, and historical examination of the various pivotal points of Canada’s past, students will be led to an understanding of where present day Canada came from and where it is going, given the ongoing Constitutional debates within its geographical boundaries.

      History 2213 – British History To 1689

      This course traces British history from the Celts to the Glorious Revolution. Particular attention is paid to the development of influential institutions unique to Britain such as the monarch, the parliament, the church and trade.

      History 2223 – British History From 1689 To 1990

      This course traces the social, economic, and political developments which made Britain the greatest empire in history and then brought about its decline.

      History 2413 – Introduction To The Study Of African History

      This course is an overview of the main phases of Africa’s history and its historiographical development. It will introduce students to African political and social organization and representation through the colonial period.

      History 2613 – Europe: 1500 To The Present

      This course explores themes in European history from the Early Modern period to the present. It examines people, events, movements, and ideas, particularly as they contributed to Europe’s rise to world dominance and its gradual decline from that position.

      History 2833 – North American: 1500 To The Present

      This course explores selected themes in North American history from initial European settlement to the end of the Cold War. Comparative summary attention will be given to settlement patterns, regionalism, ethnicity, politics, and economics in the United States and Canada.

      History 3013 – Probing The Past: The Nature of History I

      This course will provide students with a thorough introduction to the discipline of History. Selected topics will examine the nature of historical knowledge and the process of studying and understanding the past. A variety of themes will be highlighted including the philosophical foundations of History; the writings of great historians; the intellectual and technical skills involved in researching, writing, and interpreting History; and the significance of a Christian perspective on the past.

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours at the 2000 level.

      History 3023 – Probing The Past: The Nature of History II

      This course is a continuation of History 3013.

      Prerequisite: History 3013.

      History 3113 – Medieval Europe

      This course traces the key elements of the Medieval world, including the church, monasticism, and feudalism, from their origins in a declining Roman Empire to the beginning of the Reformation.

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 3133 – Victorian Britain

      This course explores life and society during the reign of Queen Victoria in Britain (1837-1901). It examines various themes pertaining to the period, including the British Empire, women and their roles, politics, religion, middle class, economics, and industry.

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 3213 – The Ancient World

      This course is designed as an introduction to the history of the ancient world. Beginning with the Sumerians (3000 B.C.E.), the culture, social institutions, and achievements of the main civilizations of the Ancient Near East are surveyed up to and including the Persian Period (333 B.C.E.)

      Corequisites: History 1113, 1123 and Religious Studies 2003, 2033.

      History 3223 – The Greco-Roman World

      This course is designed to bring students to a basic understanding of the Greco-Roman world. This includes the political, military, social, religious, and intellectual histories of the period.

      Corequisites: History 1113, 1123 and Religious Studies 2003, 2033.

      History 3233 – Peoples And Cultures of Africa In Historical Transition

      This survey course introduces students to the cultural transitions experienced by some of the main peoples that inhabit Africa today.  It considers these societies’ traditional cultures and how they have been transformed by western and other contacts.

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 3413 – Europe: From Renaissance to Reformation

      This course examines western Europe during the Renaissance and traces the beginning of modern ideals in the Western world. Topics include the beginning of modern science, global interaction, and the fragmentation of the Church.

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 3453 – Modern European Art and Cultural History (1450-1980)

      This course covers the intellectual history of artistic content and expression as it reflects social and intellectual developments from the Renaissance and the rise of perspective and landscape in painting (with special attention to Claude, Gainsborough, and Monet) to the decline of representational perspective and landscape painting in abstract and post-modern art (with special attention to Picasso, Hepworth, and Francis Bacon II). Field trips to art galleries are included in this course. (This course is normally offered in conjunction with the Crandall-Oxford Study Programme.)

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 3463 – European Intellectual History in the Modern Era

      This course is an intellectual history of Europe from the French Revolution to the present day. By examining important developments in the areas of science, philosophy, religion, and politics, students will become familiar with some of the key ideas that helped define the nature of this two hundred year period.

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 3513, 3523 – Directed Studies in History

      These courses are available for students when their interests and professors’ expertise allow for a more in-depth tutorial approach. Students must be highly capable and must have completed upper level prerequisite courses in the area of the directed study.

      Prerequisite: Permission of the Registrar.

      History 3613 – Nineteenth Century Europe

      Beginning with the background of the French Revolution, the course examines major developments of European History which see Europe reach the paramount position in the world.

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 3623 – Twentieth Century Europe

      Beginning with World War I, the course examines the dramatic developments in the twentieth century that have reshaped world history and the relative position of Europe within it.

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 3643* – The Reformation in Europe

      This course examines the development of Protestantism as a social, economic, political, and religious reaction to the status quo of European society.

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 3663 – Autobiography And Life Writing In 19thand 20thCentury English Canada

      This course explores autobiography and other forms of “life writing” as important sources for understanding individual life experiences in 19th and 20th century English Canada.

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 3813 – Colonial America: 1492 to 1763

      This course will explore the main themes in the history of Colonial America beginning with Christopher Columbus and his voyages of discovery in the late 15th century.  Course topics will include the period of European exploration of the New World, the first attempts at colonization by European nations, and the development of Colonial society up to the Seven Years War.

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 3823 – America: From The Revolution to the Civil War

      This course will explore the main themes in the history of the United States, from the causes and consequences of the American Revolution in the 1760’s and 1770’s to the crisis which caused the Civil War a century later.

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 3833 – Modern Revolutions

      This course examines themes common to several modern revolutions including the American, French, and Russian revolutions.

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 3883* – Intellectual History of Science and Religion (1600-1980)

      From theory to paradigm, from the telescope to the atom and beyond (with selected study of Copernicus, Newton, Darwin, biblical archaeology, Einstein, and Hawking), this course examines the Proofs Scientific, in their historical contexts, as marshalled for and against religion. Field trips to museums are included. (This course is normally offered in conjunction with the Crandall-Oxford Study Programme.)

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 3923 – Maritime Provinces Since 1800

      This course will explore the development of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island in the post-Confederation period. Maritime adjustment to political union and its role within Confederation will be examined. Special emphasis will be placed on social, religious, economic, and political trends in the context of regional disparity.

      Prerequisites: History 1113, 1123 or six credit hours in History at the 2000 level.

      History 4103 – Canadian Culture and Ideas

      This advanced seminar course explores selected themes in intellectual and cultural history in twentieth century Canada through readings, discussion, and class presentations. Prerequisites: Twelve credit hours in History or permission of the Registrar.

      History 4213 – Stuart England

      This seminar-style course will focus upon selected topics and themes in late-Tudor and early-Stuart England. Topics may vary from year to year and will focus on the political, social, and religious context and various interpretations of the period. Important topics such as the civil war and revolution, the protectorate, and the restoration of the monarchy will be included. Students will be encouraged to identify themes of personal interest for their major research project.

      Prerequisites: Twelve credit hours in History or permission of the Registrar.

      History 4233 – Women In Early Modern Britain

      This seminar course explores the place and role of women in early-modern England (1500-1714). It focuses on economic, political, social, and religious themes.

      Prerequisites: Twelve credit hours in History or permission of the Professor.

      History 4303 – Women In Southern African History

      This course seeks to identify and examine the place of women in the history and historiography of Southern Africa, especially as the place of women relates to the influence of settler colonialism.

      Prerequisites: Twelve credit hours in History or permission of the Professor.

      History 4513, 4523 – Advanced Directed Studies in History

      These courses are available for students when their interests and professors’ expertise allow for a more in-depth tutorial or project approach. Students must be highly capable and must have completed upper level prerequisite courses in the area of the directed study.

      Prerequisites: Twelve credit hours in History or permission of the Professor.

      History 4813* – Canadian Religious History

      This seminar-style course will focus upon selected religious themes in 19th and 20th century Canada. Topics will vary from year to year and may include the role of religion in regional development, politics, economics, secularization, gender formation, consumerism, and education. Students are encouraged to identify themes of interest for their major research projects.

      Prerequisites: Twelve credit hours in History or permission of the Professor.

      History 4853 – Internship in History

      This course is a supervised research practicum in a media, archival, legal, publishing, or museum setting involving eighty hours of monitored work. Acceptance into this course is contingent upon the availability of placements and the permission of the Professor.

      History 4996 – Thesis

      Certain exceptional students, upon request prior to the completion of their third year, may be granted permission to write a thesis as an element to their Honours degree requirement.