Bachelor of Arts in Biology

Bachelor of Science in Biology

    Study the World’s Amazing Life Forms

    Biology explores the world of living organisms. Findings in this field are crucial to advancements in agriculture, medicine, biotechnology and ecology. A degree in Biology from Crandall University will help you gain the analysis, interpretation and communications skills needed to begin your career in science or pursue advanced educational studies.

    Together, with your professors and classmates, you will study the functions and interactions of living organisms by investigating their structure, behavior and life processes. In addition, you will have the opportunity to develop skills that enhance your understanding of the world by completing the university’s holistic liberal arts core curriculum.

    In addition to studying Biology, the following minors are available to students in the Bachelor of Science program:
    Business Accounting
    Business Economics and Finance
    Business Management
    Business Marketing
    English Creative Writing
    English Literature
    Health Sciences
    History
    Human Kinesiology (new)
    Psychology
    Religious Studies
    Sociology
    Worship Arts

    Special Program Highlights for a Bachelor of Science Degree
    in Biology

    • Classes are small, so you receive lots of hands-on help from professors,  which is an enormous advantage in scientific exploration.
    • Take courses that help you gain more than the skills of a biologist. A degree in Biology from Crandall will help you develop as a human being.
    • Biology classes are “high contact.” In labs and class discussions, you will interact heavily with other students and your professors.
    • Conduct experiments in the University’s “outdoor lab” located within the nearby scrub forest where a natural stream runs along the edge of the Crandall  campus. Some of the research we undertake through the program would be considered “graduate level” at other universities.
    • Take field trips to such places as the Bay of Fundy and nearby wildlife preserves to band birds and study in the field.
    • Biology students have the opportunity to participate in the CUBS Biology Society on campus.

    Interesting Courses You May Take during a Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology

    Environmental Issues – Students explore the implications of human involvement in world ecosystems and applications of ecological principles to current world programs. Field trips to interesting scientific locations are often a part of the course.

    Microbiology – Through this course, students examine the microbial world: prokaryotic and eukaryotic, free-living and parasitic. Participants gain an understanding of the significance of microorganisms in human life and the natural world.

    Advanced Research – This hands-on research course is intended for senior students to help them gain experience in experimental design and fieldwork or laboratory methods commonly used in biology. Students develop competence in research design and application and in analysis and communication of results.

    Genetics – Examine the fundamental principles in current hereditary theory including patterns of inheritance, linkage, pedigree analysis, and mutation.

    Christianity and Natural Science – Investigate the historical development of natural science and the relationship of science to the Bible, Christian Theology, and the institution.

    Meet Your Instructors

    • All Biology faculty members hold a PhD in their field.
    • One department professor is a microbiologist, one a geneticist and another a biochemist. Dr. Schriver, the Department Coordinator, holds extensive  connections in the field, which he uses to benefit his classes and the program.
    • All Biology professors enjoy teaching students and appreciate the opportunities for close student interaction that Crandall University provides.

    Professors

    Melbourne Schriver Ph.D.

    Professor of Chemistry - Dept. Coordinator

    Contact Melbourne

    Zhan Yang Ph.D.

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Contact Zhan

    Coreen Bodner Ph.D.

    Part-time Lecturer of Biology and Mathematics

    Contact Coreen

    Career Outlook for Biology Majors

    Students who graduate from Crandall with a degree in Biology often go on to graduate school, medical school or obtain their teaching credentials. Others pursue careers in health sciences, environmental studies or natural resource management.

    Sound interesting?

    Call Toll Free1-888-968-6228 for more information
    or email us at 
    admissions@crandallu.ca

    Degree Requirements

    The primary purpose of all the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Business Administration degrees at Crandall University is to give students the academic background for lives of learning, living, and service with a Christian perspective.  The minimum credit hours required to complete any of these degrees is 120.

    I. Core Requirements

    Core requirements of 30 credit hours are required as follows:

    A. English 1013,1023 – Literary Heritage I and II (6 cr. hrs.)
    B. History 1113,1123 – World History I and II (6 cr. hrs.)
    C. Religious Studies 1003 – The Themes of the Bible (3 cr. hrs.)
    D. Religious Studies 1033 – Introduction to Christian Thought (3 cr. hrs.)
    E. Religious Studies 2003, 2033 – Old/New Testament in Its Context (6 cr. hrs.)
    F. Religious Studies 3853 – Christianity & Natural Science (3 cr. hrs.)
    G. Interdisciplinary Studies 4013 – Worldview Seminar (3 cr. hrs.)

    II. Area Requirements

    Area study options of 24 credit hours are required as follows:  (Each major will state their area requirements specifically as well as require additional cognate courses.)

    A. Mathematics 1253, 2253 – Statistic for the Life Sciences I & II (6 cr. hrs.)
    B. Economics, Psychology, Sociology or designated Communication Studies elective (This includes CO1013, 1033, 2723, 3413, 3423, and 4493) (3 cr. hrs.)
    C. Any Religious Studies course with a second digit below 5 (This designates Bible-oriented courses) (3 cr. hrs.)
    D. Chemistry 1013, 1023 – Introduction to Chemistry I & II (6 cr. hrs.)
    E. Chemistry 2113 – Organic Chemistry (3 cr. hrs.)
    F. Physics 1113 – Physics for the Life Sciences (3 cr. hrs.)

    III.  Major Requirements

    Major course requirements are 42 credit hours minimum.

    IV.  Electives

    Elective options are needed to complete a total of 120 credit hours.  At least 66 credit hours of the 120 must be taken in Mathematics and the Natural Sciences.  No more than 15 credit hours may be taken outside the Arts, Science, and Business Administration disciplines.

    V. Community Practicums

    One Community Practicum must be completed for every two semesters of full-time study.

    Major Requirements

    The B.Sc. in Biology degree gives students the opportunity to explore the diversity of life forms, their complex inter-relatedness, and the foundational issues related to their studies.  A major in Biology will form the basis for graduate studies, for professional studies in education, medicine, dentistry, or pharmacy, or for entry-level jobs in various careers related to science.

    Major – 42 credit hours in Biology including:  1013, 1023, 2013, 3423, and 4913.  Nine further semester courses are required, four of which must have lab components.  In addition, students majoring in Biology must take the following cognate courses:  CH1013, 1023, 2113, PY1113, MT1253and MT2253..

    Honours – 54 credit hours in Biology including the following required courses: 1013, 1023, 2013, 2113, 2213, 3203, 3423, 4113 plus eight other courses in Biology, two of which must have a lab component and 4996.  In addition, a student completing the Honours degree must take the following cognate courses:  CH1013, 1023, 2113, PY1113, MT1253 and MT2253.  A CGPA of 3.00 for the degree is required.  No mark below C- can be credited toward the degree and no mark below B- can be credited toward the major.  Admission to Honours takes place during the second semester of the third year and consists of having the thesis application approved by the Research and Ethics  Committee.

    Course Options

    Biology 1013 – Introduction to Biology I

    This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of biology including cell biology, genetics, and zoology.  (3-hour lab)

    Prerequisite:  Grade 12 Biology or permission of the Registrar.

    Biology 1023 – Introduction to Biology II

    This course is a continuation of Biology 1013, including botany, ecology, evolution, and animal physiology.  (3-hour lab)

    Prerequisite:  Biology 1013 or Permission of the Registrar.

    Biology 1613 – Foundations to Biology I

    This course is an initial part of introduction to biology followed by BI1623 and will provide the basic foundation for studies in biology.  The two courses present a broad survey of different areas of biology including the structure and function of cells, genetics, the origin of life, and the kingdoms of life.

    Prerequisite:  Grade 12 Biology or permission of the Registrar.

    Biology 1623 – Foundations to Biology II

    This course is the second part of introduction to biology following BI1613 and will provide the basic foundation for studies in biology.  The two courses present a broad survey of different areas of biology including the structure and function of cells, genetics, the origin of life, the kingdoms of life, human anatomy and physiology.

    Prerequisite:  Biology 1613.

    Biology 2013 – Ecology

    This course explores the principle theories of ecology.  Community dynamics including the effects of abiotic factors in aquatic and terrestrial habitats will be examined.

    Prerequisites:  Biology 1013, 1023.

    Biology 2113 – Botany

    The characteristics of plant structure, function, and communication will be investigated.  Plant divisions from algae to angiosperms will be examined, with emphasis on diversity and adaptive strategies.  (3-hour lab)

    Prerequisites:  Biology 1013, 1023.

    Biology 2213 – The Animal Kingdom

    Animal phyla from protists to mammalia will be examined in this course.  Life history strategy and morphology will be emphasized.  (3-hour lab)

    Prerequisites:  Biology 1013, 1023.

    Biology 2413 – Brain and Behaviour

    This course provides an introduction to biopsychology, the scientific study of the biology of behaviour.  This course will introduce the anatomy and function of the systems, structures, and cells that make up the human nervous system.  The role of the brain in the sensory and motor systems and the ability of the brain to continually change and adapt will be examined.  The current biopsychological research into topics such as hunger, sleep, addiction, emotion, and psychiatric disorders will also be explored.

    Biology 3013 – Environmental Issues

    The implications of human involvement in world ecosystems and application of ecological principles to current world problems will be discussed.  Some field trips may be arranged.

    Prerequisites:  Biology 1013, 1023, and 2013.

    Biology 3113 – Developmental Biology

    This course will begin by studying the process of gametogenesis, paying special attention to meiotic processes and the maturation of the individual gametes.  The reaction of the spermatozoan and egg during fertilization will then be studied.  The processes of cleavage, gastrulation, and the formation of primary organ rudiments will be followed for representative vertebrates with an emphasis on the similarities between groups.  The development of ecodermal, mesodermal, and endodermal organs will be studied primarily in the mammal.

    Prerequisites:  Biology 1013, 1023.

    Biology 3123 – Microbiology

    This course is an examination of the microbial world: prokaryotic and eukaryotic, free-living, and parasitic.  An understanding of the significance of microorganisms in human lives and the natural world will be developed.  (3-hour lab)

    Prerequisites:  Biology 1013, 1023.

    Biology 3133 – Cell Biology

    This course provides an overview that focuses on cell structure, including the subcellular structures and functions in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Major cell activities such as cell motility, cell communication, transportation and protein sorting, distribution, secretion, and endocytosis will be investigated. The pathology of diseases such as cancer will be clarified on the cellular level.

    Prerequisites: Biology 1013, 1023, Pre/Corequisite: BI3203

    Biology 3153 – Microbiology for the Health Sciences

    This course is an examination of the microbial world including bacteria, virus, fungi, and protozoa. It helps students understand the significance of microorganisms for humans. It also facilitates learning on the pathology and epidemiology of different microbial diseases.  Students cannot receive credit for both BI3123 and BI3153. (Generally BI3153 will be offered only to students within the Moncton UNB Nursing program.)

    Biology 3203 – Biochemistry for Life Sciences

    An introduction to biochemistry that builds on the organic chemistry taught in Chemistry 2113, this course concentrates on form, function, and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids.  (3-hour lab)  A tutorial period is required for this course.

    Prerequisites:  Biology 1013, 1023, and Chemistry 2113.

    Biology 3323 – Plant Propagation

    This course will investigate principles of sexual and asexual reproduction in plants.  Practical application of culturing and propagating will be stressed. (3-hour lab)

    Prerequisite:  Biology 2113.

    Biology 3333 – Immunology

    This course investigates the overall immune systems such as humoral and cell-mediated immune systems. Some topics included in this course are cells and organs of the immune systems, immunoglobins, T-cells, B-cells, cytokines, leukocyte migration, and AIDS.

    Prerequisites: Biology 1013, 1023, Biology 3123, 3133 recommended.

    Biology 3343 – Nutrition

    This course introduces students to the science of human nutrition by providing an overview of the nutrients that are determinants of health.  The requirements and functions of the organic nutrients (carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and vitamins) and the inorganic nutrients (minerals and water) are presented.  Other topics covered in this course include disorders related to intake or metabolism, various methods used to assess nutrient intakes and interpretation of current research in the field of human nutrition.

    Prerequisites: Biology 1013, 1023 and Chemistry 1013, 1023 or Permission of the Registrar.

    Biology 3413 – Human Anatomy and Physiology

    Providing an introduction to the systems of the human body, this course emphasizes adaptations of organ systems which maintain homeostasis at the cellular level.  Physiological responses to external and internal stimuli and a brief examination of pathophysiology will be covered. (3-hour lab)

    Prerequisites:  Biology 1013, 1023, 3133.

    Biology 3423 – Genetics

    This course investigates fundamental principles in current hereditary theory including patterns of inheritance, pedigree analysis, linkage, recombination, and mutation.  The social and ethical implications of human genetic principles will also be considered.  (3-hour lab)

    Prerequisites:  Biology 1013, 1023.  Biology 3133 recommended.

    Biology 3513,3523 – Directed Studies in Biology

    These courses are available for students when their interests and the professor’s expertise allow for a more in-depth tutorial or project approach.  Students must be highly capable and must have completed upper level prerequisite courses in the area of study.

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Registrar.

    Biology 3613 – Animal Behaviour

    This course introduces the biological bases of animal behaviour, including human behaviour. Behavioural patterns are examined using genetic and environmental perspectives.  The genetics and ecology of social behaviour are explored.  This course is intended to provide a synthesis of current thinking on animal behaviour, and it will include examples of local species.

    Prerequisites:  Biology 1013, 1023, 2213.

    Biology 4113 – Evolution

    This course examines principle constructs, theory development, and current issues in evolutionary biology.

    Prerequisites:  12 credit hours in Biology including Biology 1013, 1023, 3423.

    Biology 4413 – Neuroscience

    This course will introduce students to current research topics in neuroscience, including molecular neurobiology, neural development, plasticity and regeneration, neuronal death, and synaptic transmission.

    Prerequisites: Biology 1013, 1023 and 2413.

    Biology 4513,4523 – Advanced Directed Studies in Biology

    These courses are available for students when their interests and the professor’s expertise allow for a more in-depth tutorial approach.  Students must be highly capable and must have completed upper level prerequisite courses in the area of the directed study.

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Registrar.

    Biology 4913 – Advanced Research

    This course is designed as a hands-on research course intended for senior students to gain experience in experimental design and field-work or laboratory methods commonly used in biology.  Through various research projects, students will develop competence in research design and application, and the analysis and communication of results.  (Preference is given to 4th year students.)

    Biology 4996 – Thesis

    Certain exceptional students, upon request prior to the completion of their third year, may be granted permission to write a thesis as an element to their Honours Degree requirements.