Bachelor of Business Administration

    Prepare for a Challenging Career in Business at Crandall’s Business School

    Studying Business Administration prepares you for a wealth of career options. At Crandall’s Business School, business students have an opportunity to concentrate their business studies in Accounting, Economics & Finance, Marketing or Management. Through the program you will learn to communicate clearly, analyze organizational issues, resolve business challenges and identify best business practices.

    The tools and skills you gain at Crandall’s Business School will equip you to succeed in a demanding career or to pursue Graduate Studies.

    In addition to studying Business, the following minors are available to Bachelor of Business Administration students:
    Biology
    Communication Studies
    English Creative Writing
    English Literature
    History
    Human Kinesiology (new)
    Psychology
    Religious Studies
    Sociology
    Worship Arts

    Special Program Highlights for Business Administration

    • Crandall’s Business School also offers the BBA Cooperative Education degree that, through on-the-job experience, provides students with the opportunity to put learning into practice while developing important career-building network connections Co-op students alternate study semesters with three work-terms during which they earn money. At our Business School,  students regularly compete in case competitions. Recently, Crandall students placed in the top three in the regional Entrepreneur Contest  and went on to the national competition.
    • Crandall often hosts case competitions on campus. Students come from throughout Eastern Canada to compete.
    • Complete a business internship for credit, if you wish. Past internships have included such activities as completing an organizational design and  implementation and working in an HR department’s policy area.
    • Join the Business Society, an active campus organization that includes both social activities and support for the group’s charitable projects.

    Interesting Courses You May Take at Crandall’s Business School

    Entrepreneurship – Students work through the process of starting up a new business with a specific concentration upon business plan preparation. Pros and cons of business ownership are examined.

    Conflict Management – The course investigates the nature of conflict, why it happens and how it can be managed. Drawing on interpersonal-small group theories and skills, the course helps students understand various types of mediation strategies and approaches to crisis management.

    Organizational Culture – Students explore the idea that collectives have their own unique cognitive, sociopolitical and material cultures. The course examines the historical development of organizational culture theory as well as contemporary perspectives.

    Business Law – Designed to examine laws governing the practice of business and the legislative framework for which trade occurs

    Business Finance – Explore the decision-making techniques employed by financial executives. Topics will include investment valuation, riskmanagement, and working capital management.

    Meet Your Instructors

    • Crandall’s Business School has expanded to include three full-time professors and five adjuncts.
    • Each professor in the department has a love for the classroom and a commitment to graduating capable business professionals.
    • The faculty includes individuals who are excellent business people in their own right. Each professor has real world experience.

    Professors

    Robert MacDonald M.B.A.

    Assistant Professor of Business Administration - Dept. Coordinator

    Contact Robert

    Alan Chan Ph.D.

    Associate Professor of Economics and Business Administration

    Contact Alan

    Heather Steeves CPA, CA

    Assistant Professor of Business Administration

    Contact Heather

    Amy Lean MacArthur M.B.A.

    Part-time Lecturer of Business Administration

    Contact Amy

    Heather Burke CPA, CA

    Vice-President for Administration and Finance / Part-time Lecturer of Business Administration

    Contact Heather

    Andrew Jardine M.B.A.

    Part-time Lecturer of Business Administration

    Contact Andrew

    Career Outlook for Business Administration Majors

    A degree in Business Administration from Crandall University prepares you for a wide range of career opportunities. Our graduates have gone on to become accountants, financial managers, information technology managers, marketers and entrepreneurs. Other students have used their Crandall education as a springboard into graduate school and an MBA.

    Sound interesting?

    Call Toll Free1-888-968-6228 for more information.
    or email us at admissions@crandallu.ca

    Courses and Requirements

    I. A core of  27 credit hours is required as follows:

    A. English 1013,1023 – Literary Heritage I and II (6 cr. hrs)
    B. History 1113,1123 –  World History I and II (6 cr. hrs)
    C. Religious Studies 1003 – The Themes of the Bible (3 cr. hrs)
    D. Religious Studies 1033 – Introduction to Christian Thought (3 cr. hrs)
    E. Religious Studies 2003, 2033 – Old/New Testament in Its Context (6 cr. hrs)
    F. Interdisciplinary Studies 4013 -Worldview Seminar (3 cr. hrs)

    II.   Area Requirements

    A minimum of 15 credit hours are required as follows:

    A. Economics 1013,1023 –  Micro/Macroeconomics (6 cr. hrs)
    B.  Language and/or Linguistics electives (6 cr. hrs)
    C.  Any Religious Studies course with a second digit below 5* (3 cr. hrs)

    (*This designates Bible-oriented courses.)

    III.   Business Requirements

    The Bachelor of Business Administration degree requires a minimum of 57 credit hours.

    IV.  Electives

    There are 21 credit hours of elective options.  At least 48 credit hours of the 120 must be at the 3000 or 4000 level.  No more than 15 credit hours may be taken outside the Arts, Science, and Business Administration disciplines.

    V. Community Practicums

    One Community Practicum must be completed for every two semesters of full-time study.

    Honours Degree Requirements

    Students interested in pursuing a Bachelor of Business Administration Honours Degree should consult their faculty advisor.  This should take place before the beginning of the third year of study, so that courses necessary to prepare for the thesis can be taken during the third and fourth year.

    The following steps must be taken during the third year:

    1. A prospective supervisor must be contacted and a possible topic discussed.
    2. A thesis application must be obtained from the Academic Office.
    3. The completed application must be approved by the prospective supervisor and submitted to the Academic Office by March 15th of the year prior to the year in which the thesis is to be done.
      Note: Late applications will not normally be considered.  They may be considered only if a letter of appeal is provided with the application.  The letter must outline a legitimate reason why the student could not submit the application on time.  The criteria for granting the appeal will be the same as if the student were applying to hand in a paper after the last day of classes or to write an examination after the examination period.
    4. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will discuss the application with the prospective supervisor and other faculty in the major and then meet with the Research and Ethics Committee to consider the merits of the application.
    5. If the proposal is not deemed to be completely satisfactory by the Research and Ethics Committee, the student may be required to revise and re-submit it over the summer.

    The following requirements must be met by those wishing to complete an Honours degree.

    (Any exceptions to these requirements must be approved by the Academic Standards and Appeals Committee, with support from the prospective supervisor, prior to presenting an application to the Research and Ethics Committee.)

    1. The student must have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 on all work credited to the degree to date.
    2. The student must have no mark below B- in any Business Administration courses.
    3. The student must have no mark below C- in any other courses credited toward the degree.
    4. It must be possible for the student to complete at least 24 credit hours of the major requirements before the beginning of the year in which the thesis is to be done, including any methodology or theory courses required for the major.
    5. At least the final 60 credit hours of the Honours degree must have been earned at Crandall University.
    6. At least 36 credit hours of Business Administration, including the 15 credit hours at the 4000 level, must be done at Crandall University.  In a case of a transfer student who applies for a thesis, the Business Administration courses transferred must be approved for credit toward an Honours degree by the Business Administration faculty.

    The following requirements must be met for an Honours Degree to be awarded:

    1. A minimum of 69 credit hours must be completed in Business Administration  based on the requirements outlined in the Programs and Course Descriptions section of the Academic Calendar.
    2. A six credit-hour thesis is included in the minimum 69 credit hours.
    3. Also, a further nine hours of course credit at the 4000 level must be included in these 69 credit hours.
    4. The Students must have cumulative GPA’s of 3.00 in the entire program.
    5. Students must have no mark below B- in any Business Administration courses.
    6. Students must have no mark below C- in any other courses credited toward the degree.

    Co-op Major Requirements

    Co-operative Education is built around a three-way partnership between the university, students, and employers.  The goal of the program is to integrate students’ theoretical knowledge with practical work experience by adding three work-term semesters to the regular Bachelor of Business Administration Program.

    The following requirements must be met by students undertaking a Bachelor of Business Administration Co-op degree:

    1. Students must have completed 15 credit hours towards the B.B.A. degree.
    2. Students must have cumulative G.P.A.’s  of no less than 2.67 (B-).
    3. Students must complete the Co-op Application form and submit  references, a resume, and a letter stating their reasons for seeking admission to the program.

    For more information students may refer to the Bachelor of Business Administration Co-op Handbook which explains the program in detail, including program structure, costs, and admission process.

    Course Options

    Business Administration 1013 – Introduction to Business

    This course provides an introduction to the field of business.  Topics covered include the nature of business and the environment in which it occurs in a Canadian context.  Attention is also given to the fields of management, marketing, accounting, and finance.

    Business Administration 1023 – Business Math

    This course is designed to equip students with a fundamental understanding of mathematics as it is applied to management, accounting, finance, and economics.  Particular attention will be given to break-even analysis, depreciation, interest, annuities, and loan amortization.

    Business Administration 1043 – Business Communications

    This course provides the business student with a foundation in key professional practices including business writing skills, public speaking and presentation skills, and behavioural expectations.  Students work individually and in groups to achieve course outcomes.

    Business Administration 1243 – Business Statistics

    This course introduces the student to statistics in business.  Topics covered include descriptive statistics, probabilities, normal distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing.

    Prerequisite:  Business Administration 1023.

    Business Administration 2003 – Co-op Work Term I

    This is the first work term for credit toward the BBA Co-op option.  Qualifying students complete a minimum 13-week employment term with an approved employer during which time they are expected to learn and develop marketable business skills.

    Prerequisites: Business Administration 1013 and permission of the Director of BBA Co-operative Education.

    Business Administration 2113 – Introductory Accounting I

    This course explores the accounting cycle and foundational concepts in financial accounting.  Particular attention is given to principal balance sheet and income statement components (accounting for assets, liabilities, owner’s equity, revenues, and expenses).

    Prerequisite:  Business Administration 1013.

    Business Administration 2123 – Introductory Accounting II

    This course is a continuation of Business Administration 2113.  Topics covered include the cash flow statement, partnership accounting, corporate accounting and related transations. Prerequisite:  Business Administration 2113 or Permission of the Professor.

    Business Administration 2223 – Business Ethics

    This course provides an introduction to moral philosophy as pertaining to the field of business.  Emphasis is placed upon the extent to which business objectives conflict with moral objectives.  The question of whether a business can successfully operate from a Christian worldview is explored.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 1013.

    Business Administration 3003 – Co-op Work Term II

    This is the second work term for credit toward the BBA Co-op option.  Qualifying students complete a minimum 13-week employment term with an approved employer during which time they are expected to learn and develop marketable business skills.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 2003 and permission of the Director of BBA Co-operative Education.

    Business Administration 3113 – Intermediate Accounting I

    This course explores the balance sheet and alternative approaches to asset and liability valuation and disclosure in accordance with the requirements of the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants Handbook and International Financial Reporting Standards.

    Prerequisite:  Business Administration 2123.

    Business Administration 3123 – Intermediate Accounting II

    This course is a continuation of Business Administration 3113.  Topics covered include accounting for publicly traded enterprises, income taxes, and other advanced topics.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 3113.

    Business Administration 3213 – Managerial Accounting I

    This course is designed to introduce the student to the main concepts and practices of accounting within the organization.  Topics covered include traditional product costing, activity based management, cost-volume-profit relationships, budgeting, and other forms of management control.

    Prerequisite:  Business Administration 2113.

    Business Administration 3223 – Managerial Accounting II

    This course explores more thoroughly the concepts from Business Administration 3213.  Topics covered include pricing decisions, cost and inventory management, cost allocation and the use of statistics in assisting management in the decision making process.

    Prerequisite:  Business Administration 3213.

    Business Administration 3313 – Business Finance I

    This course is designed to introduce the student to decision-making techniques employed by financial executives.  Topics covered include the time value of money and investment valuation.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 2123.

    Business Administration 3323 – Business Finance II

    This course is a continuation of Business Administration 3313 and includes such topics as working capital management, investment environment, and risk management.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 3313.

    Business Administration 3413 – Management Information Systems

    This is a preparatory course on the nature and use of computer based information systems.  Topics covered include system requirements for the provision of management information, decision support systems, and asset control procedures.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 3213.

    Business Administration 3433* – Visual Communications

    This course introduces key issues and concepts in Visual Communications.  The language of the visual is arguably humanity’s earliest form of communicative language.  This course explores this form of communication through a rigorous examination of the fundamental building blocks, structure, and organization of the language of the visual through a mixture of lectures, seminars, and workshops.

    Prerequisites:  Business Administration 1013.

    Business Administration 3443* – New Media Technologies and Society

    This course explores the nature and influences of technology on the art of communication and technology’s relationship to society. It focuses on new media technologies such as the Internet, Virtual Worlds, Distributed Workplace, Chat, the Virtual Reality, and their influence on how information is disseminated and received.  Media lab fee required for this course.

    Prerequisites: Business Administration 1013.

    Business Administration 3453* – Introduction to Graphic Communication

    This is a studio-based course designed to introduce students to the intricate world of graphic communications.  Students will be introduced to history and theories of graphic design and typography focusing on how these may be used to communicate ideas and messages.  Specific topics of study will include fundamental design principles, colour theory, the roles of symbols and icons, and visual story telling.  Students will be tested through a series of design exercises and projects.  Media lab fee required for this course.

    Prerequisite:  Business Administration 3813.

    Business Administration 3513,3523 – Directed Studies in Business Administration

    These courses are available for students when the their interests and the professor’s expertise allow for a more in-depth tutorial approach.  The student must be highly capable and must have completed upper level prerequisite courses in the area of the directed study.

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Registrar.

    Business Administration 3603 – Business Research Methods

    This course introduces students to research design and a variety of methods, for performing research in business.  Particular attention is given to survey design, sampling, hypothesis testing, and quantitative techniques.

    Prerequsites:  Business Administration 1243.

    Business Administration 3623 – Human Resource Management

    This course explores the management of an organization’s most important asset – its people.  With an emphasis upon current developments in the field, topics discussed include trends in human resource planning, recruitment and selection, compensation, and employee development.

    Prerequisite:  Business Administration 3713.

    Business Administration 3633 – Industrial Relations

    This course examines the complex relationships between organizational management and organized labour, i.e. unions.  Current issues are explored, with an emphasis upon collective bargaining and negotiation.

    Prerequisite:  Business Administration 3623.

    Business Administration 3713 – Principles of Management

    This course examines the manager and the management process.  With respect to the functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling, students will be encouraged to think critically about the problems managers face and conduct analyses toward the development of recommendations relevant to such problems.

    Prerequisites: Business Administration 1013.

    Business Administration 3733 – Organizational Behaviour

    This course examines the theories that explain human behaviour in organizational settings, as well as the structures and processes of contemporary organizations.  Topics covered include personality and perception, team and small group processes, and motivation and emotions.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 3713. (Students cannot receive credit for both BU3733 and PS3953.)

    Business Administration 3753* – Leadership

    This course explores classic and contemporary issues in leadership theory and practice.  Topics covered include leadership behaviours and substitutes, the role of the follower in the leadership process, and transformational leadership.

    Prerequisites:  Business Administration 3713.

    Business Administration 3813 – Marketing

    This is an introductory course to the field of marketing in which the concepts of marketing strategy and the marketing environment are examined.  Topics covered include target market definition, the concept of the marketing mix, and the influence of supply and demand forces on consumption.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 1013.

    Business Administration  3823 – International Marketing

    This course is designed to provide an introduction to marketing in the global business environment.  Major topics include social, political, and cultural influences on the sale of products and services internationally, and the development of international market profiles.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 3813.

    Business Administration 3833* –  Public Relations

    This course explores issues faced by organizations as they seek to communicate effectively with their publics (e.g. shareholders, employees, community groups, etc.).  Emphasis is placed upon the development of communication plans and crisis communication management.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 3813.

    Business Administration 3863 – Consumer Behaviour

    This course examines how marketers identify and work with sources of influence (i.e. media) and how consumers make decisions in response to persuasion.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 3813

    Business Administration 3913 – Business Law

    This is an introductory course designed to examine laws governing the practice of business and the legislative framework in which trade occurs.

    Prerequisites:  Business Administration 1013 plus six additional credit hours in Business Administration.

    Business Administration 3923 – Entrepreneurship

    This course involves working through the process of starting up a new business with a specific concentration upon business plan preparation.  The concept of entrepreneurship is considered and the pros and cons of business ownership are examined.

    Prerequisites: Business Administration 2113, 3713, 3813.

    Business Administration 4003 – Co-op Work Term III

    This is the third and final work term for credit toward the BBA Co-op option.  Qualifying students complete a minimum 13-week employment term with an approved employer during which time they are expected to learn and develop marketable business skills.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 3003 and permission of the Director of BBA Co-operative Education.

    Business Administration 4053 – Christianity and Business

    This course explores the relationship between Christianity and Business and seeks to answer important questions that confront the business practitioner.  Can a person achieve success in business and still be true to his or her faith?  Are Christianity and Business mutually exclusive?  What is God’s perspective on business?  Is there such a thing as “Christian Business”?  Can the Bible be used as a guide for business practice?  Can God be glorified in business?  Readings and discussions will include the Bible and secular and faith based authors.   Capitalism, profit, leadership, human resource management, etc. will be explored in light of Christianity.

    Prerequisites:  36 credit hours in Business Administration plus Religious Studies 1003, 1033. Admission is limited to students in their final year of study in the BBA.

    Business Administration 4113 – Advanced Accounting I

    This course explores the more advanced topics of accounting and examines the alternatives discussed in the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants Handbook, including the requirements of consolidations and accounting for non-profit organizations.

    Prerequisites:  Business Administration 3123.

    Business Administration 4123 – Advanced Accounting II

    This course examines in greater depth the concept of consolidations, including foreign transactions, and income tax allocations.

    Prerequisite:  Business Administration 4113.

    Business Administration 4433 – Personal Taxation

    This course introduces the principles of taxation, basic elements of tax law, and the reasoning behind the specific provisions of tax policy in a Canadian context.  By examining personal and business elements of taxation, students are encouraged to consider the effects upon investment and decision making.

    Prerequisite:  Business Administration 2123.

    Business Administration 4443 – Corporate Taxation

    This course builds on the principles introduced in BU4413 by examining corporate taxation in a Canadian context.  In addition, tax planning is expanded to examine the interaction of the personal needs of sharesholders and the corporate tax structure.  Students are encouraged to consider the effects upon investment, financing, and decision-making.

    Prerequisite:  Business Administration 4433.

    Business Administration 4453 – Accounting Theory

    This course helps students develop an understanding of the economic impact of accounting choices from both theoretical and practical viewpoints.  Beginning with an examination of the historical development of accounting thought, students are encouraged to develop an understanding of the limitations of the current accounting model through examination of various accounting elements and analysis of current accounting research.

    Corequisite: Business Administration 3113.

    Business Administration 4493* – Conflict Management

    This course investigates the nature of conflict, why it happens, and how it can be managed.  Drawing on interpersonal-small group theories and skills, the course seeks to understand various types of mediation strategies and approaches to crisis management.

    Prerequisites: Business Administration 3713.

    Business Administration 4513, 4523 – Advanced Directed Studies in Business Administration

    These courses are available for students when their interests and the professor’s expertise allow for a more in-depth tutorial approach.  The student must be highly capable and have completed upper level prerequisite courses in the area of the directed study.

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Registrar.

    Business Administration 4633 – Recruitment, Selection and Training

    This is a senior level course in Human Resource Management that focuses on the theoretical and practical considerations involved in staffing an organization.  Topics of study include labour supply/demand forecasting, job analysis, internal and external recruitment, selection strategies, and training and development for performance and retention.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 3623.

    Business Administration 4643 – Compensation Management

    This course examines the human resource implications of direct and indirect compensation.  Students will explore the various means of employee remuneration and the ways in which compensation decisions are made, the balance between profitability and payroll, and the role of ethics and equity in the reward process.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 3623

    Business Administration 4713 – Strategic Management

    This course represents a culmination of business study, in that it draws upon all business disciplines (management, accounting, marketing, finance, etc.) in an effort to identify, analyze, and make recommendations concerning actual business problems.  Emphasis is placed upon the development of analytical skills in the application of contemporary models of strategic analysis to business case studies.  Admission is limited to students in their final year of study in the BBA.

    Prerequisites: Business Administration 3313, 3713, 3813.

    Business Administration 4723 – Advanced Strategy

    This course builds on concepts explored in BU4713 and is intended for students interested in developing a deeper understanding of evaluative frameworks that are key to corporate performance.  The course has a particular focus on the case method of analysis.

    Prerequisite: Business Administration 4713

    Business Administration 4733 – Organizational Theory

    This course builds upon the foundation established in Business Administration 3733 with a particular focus on the issues faced by more complex forms of organization (teams, corporations, multinationals, etc.).  Topics covered include team dynamics, organizational power and politics, conflict and negotiation, organizational structure and design, and corporate culture.

    Prerequisite:  Business Administration 3733.

    Business Administration 4743 – Organizational Culture

    This course studies organizational culture – the idea that collectives have their own unique cognitive, sociopolitical, and material culture.  The historical development of organizational culture theory will be examined, in addition to contemporary perspectives.  These perspectives will then be applied to seek to explain the impact of organizational culture as a determinant of structure, human resource practices, leadership, decision-making processes, etc.

    Prerequisites: Business Administration 3713 plus three credit hours in Management or Permission of the Professor.

    Business Administration 4823 – Export Marketing

    This course examines the intricacies of marketing products and services outside of Canada and matches students with organizations outside of the university environment that are seeking to establish extra-domestic trade relationships for the first time.  Students are required to plan and implement export strategies and more specifically prepare a market entry plan for their client organization that will then be used as the underpinning of a trade mission that will take place during the semester.

    Prerequisite:  Business Administration 3823 and Permission of the Professor.

    Business Administration 4853 – Internship in Business Administration

    This course is designed for students in the final year of their BBA to give practical experience in the application of Business knowledge gained in the program.  The course requires a full day of work per week (or the equivalent) for the entire semester in an approved placement.  Field Supervisors, in conjunction with the professor of record, will assist students in assessing their own strengths and identifying areas for future professional growth.

    Prerequisites:  Admission to the course is contingent on the availability of placements and the permission of the Professor.

    Business Administration 4996 – Thesis

    Certain exceptional students, upon request prior to the completion of their third year, may be granted permission to write a thesis as an element of their Honours Degree requirements.

    Specific requirements are explained in the Honours Distinction description at the beginning of this section.