Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

Gain Understanding of Human Development and Behavior

Are you interested in exploring the why behind people’s actions?  Are you intrigued by the workings of the human mind?  If so, the study of Psychology may be an ideal major for you.

When you study for a degree in Psychology at Crandall, you join in our quest for knowledge about individual development and behavior in a social context.  You will learn to evaluate research and grow in your understanding of psychological theories.  Through your coursework, you will think critically and gain insights into yourself as well as others.

By the time you graduate with a degree in Psychology, you will be well prepared to work in service and counseling organizations and to pursue advanced studies in Psychology or a related field.

What to expect when you graduate

A degree in psychology from Crandall University prepares you to work in certain counselling situations such as youth group home counselling, service agencies and similar entry-level positions. Other positions, like clinical psychologist, require  further professional or graduate studies. Past Crandall psychology graduates have been accepted into programs like the Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology program at the Université de Moncton and Law at UNB.

Special Program Highlights for a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology

  • Explore such interesting academic areas as early childhood development, developmental disabilities, gerontology, forensic psychology, criminology, perspectives on poverty, behavior disorders and communication disorders.
  • Assist Psychology professors with their research projects to gain valuable first hand experience.
  • Learn from interesting classroom guests such counselors who work in prisons and other therapeutic settings.
  • Discover more about yourself through intensive classroom activities like “Peeling back our individual stories” from our public selves to our private selves.
  • Get lots of support and mentoring throughout your degree in Psychology from your professors in our small class environment.
  • Visit area service agencies in Moncton with your classmates to understand the psychological services made available in the area.
  • Join the Psychology Society, a campus service organization composed of Psychology majors.

Your possible career paths & areas of continued study:

  • Psychologist
  • Counsellor/Psychotherapist
  • Teacher
  • Mental Health Care Worker
  • Youth Residential Worker
  • Law Enforcement
  • Speech Therapist
  • Nurse
  • Lawyer
  • And more!

Meet Your Instructors

  • Our Psychology professors are educated in a broad range of psychological disciplines.
  • From ministry and counseling to providing psychiatric care in a medical school facility, all professors have experience working in the field.
  • Mentoring students is a priority to the Psychology department faculty.

Professors

Tracy Freeze Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Contact Tracy

Edith Samuel Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Psychology - Dept. Coordinator

Contact Edith

Interesting Courses You May Take during a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology

Sports Psychology – Examine some of the ways Psychology has been applied to the world of sports.  Areas examined include methods of training and coaching, teamwork and leadership, motivation and stress and social issues in sports.  Current theoretical perspectives of personality factors in sports and the psychological effects of sports will be investigated.

Psychology of Attachment – Offers an overview of the current state of knowledge of attachment across the lifespan. Attachment theory offers a framework for describing and understanding close emotional bonds in relationships.

Memory – Examines the literature and research on the physical basis, development, functions, and disabilities of human memory. The emphasis will be on the contemporary understanding of memory.

Forensic Psychology - Examines psychologists contributions and interactions to the civil and criminal justice systems, the correctional and parole services, and public safety.

Psychopathology - Investigates the theoretical and chemical explanations and treatments of disordered behaviour.

Resources for more information careers in psychology:

Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association
Canadian Psychological Association
Professional Association of Christian Counsellors
The New Brunswick Association of Counselling Therapists

Career Outlook for Psychology Majors

A degree in Psychology from Crandall University prepares you to work in certain counseling situations such as employment counseling, service agencies and similar entry-level positions.  In order to advance in the field of psychology, most graduates need to pursue advanced training.  Past Crandall graduates now work in mental health care, behavioral therapy, law enforcement, employment counseling, family counseling and residential treatment centers.

“Crandall’s Psychology program is exceptional! The professors go over and above to make sure you have all the opportunities you need to succeed. They care about students’ general welfare and take pride in their students doing excellent work.”

Melissa Moore, Psychology major,
Class of 2011

Sound interesting?

Call Toll Free1-888-968-6228 for more information
or email us at </strong><strong>admissions@crandallu.ca


Major Requirements

The B.A. in Psychology provides students with an understanding of individual development and behaviour in a social context.  Theory and the critical evaluation of research are stressed.  Graduates from this degree program are prepared for a wide variety of career options including graduate study in psychology, law, business, ministry, and various human services professions.

Major - 39 credit hours in Psychology including 1013, 1023, 2033, 3333, 3603, 3913, 4613, one course in Developmental Psychology (either 2213, 2223 or 2233), one additional 4000 level course and four further courses, three of which must be at the 3000-4000 level.  In addition, students majoring in Psychology must take the following cognate courses:   Mathematics 1203, 1233.

Honours - 54 credit hours in Psychology including 1013, 1023, 2033, 3333, 3603, 3913, 4613, 4996; plus nine further courses in Psychology including at least three at the 4000 level.  At least one of these courses must be taken in Developmental Psychology (either 2213, 2223, or 2233).  Those doing Honours in Psychology must take Mathematics 1203 and 1233 as cognate requirements.  A CGPA of 3.00 for the degree is required.  No mark below C- can be credited toward the degree and no mark below B- can be credited toward the major.  Admission to Honours takes place during the second semester of the third year and consists of having the thesis application approved by the Research and Ethics Committee.

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Courses

Psychology 1013 – Introduction to Psychology I

This introductory course acquaints students with the fundamental elements needed to understand ways of explaining human behaviour.  It includes the study of topics such as theories of human development, perception, motivation, learning, and personality.

Psychology 1023 – Introduction to Psychology II

This course is a continuation of Psychology 1013.

Psychology 2033 – Theories of Personality

This course provides an examination and evaluation of the early outstanding theories of personality within the field of Psychology.

Prerequisites: Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 2213* -Early Childhood Development

This course will apply developmental psychological findings to early childhood education and care, early experience and heredity, and learning and perception, to understand how such factors affect the cognitive and social development of the young child.  Case studies pertaining to early infantile autism and child abuse will be examined in detail.

Psychology 2223* – Adolescent Development

A survey of the physical, intellectual, emotional and social dimensions of adolescents as they mature and adjust during years of transition and change, with special consideration of the work of noted psychologists specializing in the study of the adolescent years.

Psychology 2233 – Adult Development

This course seeks to sensitize students to the theories and reality of adulthood and aging by introducing them to selected literature on adult development and to the preparation of a case record which includes mastering the scientific processes that permit an analysis of the adult world.

Psychology 3043* – Perspectives on Poverty

This course introduces students to current research and theory on poverty, the interplay between structural and personal causes of poverty, and the personal experience of poverty in Canada.  The multiple systems that intersect with poverty, including family, school, health care, and criminal justice, are examined, and previous and current assumptions about this social problem are challenged.  While the primary focus will be on Canadian poverty, there is a cursory look at the global perspective.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 3103 – Social Psychology

This course investigates how individual characteristics associated with feelings, thoughts, and actions are influenced by the social setting.  The content of this course includes topics such as aggression, prejudice, attraction, persuasion, and conformity.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 3203 – Sports Psychology

This course examines some of the ways psychology has been applied to the world of sports.  Areas examined will be methods of training and coaching, teamwork and leadership, motivation and stress, and social issues in sport.  Current theoretical perspectives of personality factors in sports and the psychological effects of sports will be investigated.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 3213* – Language Development

This course examines the sequence of language development spanning the entire life span.  Emphasis will be placed on major theoretical approaches to language development and on related areas such as cognition and literacy.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 3243* – Developmental Disabilities

After examining normal cognitive and social development of the child, this course will survey present research pertaining to various developmental disabilities in children, youth, and adults.  Case studies in selected areas will be utilized.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023 or Psychology 2213 plus three additional credit hours in Psychology.

Psychology 3313 – Cognition

This course examines principles, theories, and research as they relate to learning, cognition and affective processes.  Models of cognitive functioning and the interaction of memory, cognition, and affect are explored.  Emphasis on the specific content may vary from year to year.

Prerequisites: Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 3323 – Sensation and Perception

This course provides an introduction to the study of sensation and perception.  The course will include an examination of the process by which humans receive, select, analyze, and process sensory information and how this information is perceived.  Students will participate in class demonstrations of perceptual phenomena and will develop their individual research skills. (A lab component is included with this course.)

Prerequisites: Psychology 1013, 1023; Corequisite: Psychology 3603.

Psychology 3333 – Introduction to Neuropsychology

This course will examine what has been revealed about brain function through the use of specialized tests and measures.  Particular emphasis will be placed on studies that provide insight into behaviourally observable phenomena and corresponding brain functions.

Prerequisites: Psychology 1013, 1023 plus six additional credit hours in Psychology.

Psychology 3413 – Behaviour Modification

This course will survey a comprehensive overview of the concepts and rules of behaviour modification and their relevance for today’s application in everyday life.  Major ethical and social issues will be examined and discussed.  This course will provide students with rudimentary skills that they can put into practice in their own lives.  Students will also acquire an understanding of how behaviours are developed in themselves and in others.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023 plus six additional credit hours in Psychology.

Psychology 3513, 3523 – Directed Studies in Psychology

These courses are available for approved students in situations where their interests and professors’ expertise allow for a more in-depth tutorial approach.  Students must be highly capable and must have completed upper level prerequisite courses in the area of the directed study.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Registrar.

Psychology 3603 – Research Methods in Psychology

An introductory methods and procedures course designed to acquaint students with the quantitative and qualitative strategies and approaches used in doing Psychological research.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 3613 – Memory

This course examines the literature and research on the physical basis, development, functions, and disabilities of human memory.  The emphasis will be on the contemporary understanding of memory.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 3623 – Forensic Psychology

This course is a survey of psychology’s contributions and interventions to the civil and criminal justice systems, the correctional and parole services, and public safety.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 3633 – Theories of Learning

This course will provide an overview of the ideas and research related to animal and human learning.  Background on various issues that has shaped the understanding of this field over the years will also be included, as will more recent studies that address the intricacies of how learning occurs.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 3643 – Gender Studies

This course will examine gender and gender relations in Canada through a broad range of gender-related topics. Students will be introduced to the idea of gender as a social construction, and as it thus affects behaviour, beliefs, attitudes, and interpersonal relationships of women and men throughout their lives. Theory, core concepts, and controversial issues on several themes will be reviewed.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 3703 – Psychopathology

This course is an examination of theoretical and clinical explanations and treatment of disordered behaviour.  Topics studied include disorders of anxiety, mood, personality, and developmental problems.

Prerequisites: Psychology 1013, 1023 plus six additional credit hours in Psychology.

Psychology 3723* -  Psychological Tests and Measurement

This course will involve a survey of psychological tests used in both individual assessment and research areas.  Principles of test construction and evaluation will be central concepts in the study of selected tests.

Prerequisites: Psychology 1013, 1023 plus six additional credit hours in Psychology.

Psychology 3773* – Communication Disorders

This course surveys the field of human communication disorders.  It will commence with a brief examination of the basics of the field, including the professions concerned with human communication disorders, definitions of the oral-verbal aspects of communication, and the anatomy and physiology of the human speech mechanism.  This will be followed by an introduction to various speech and language disorders.  Finally, the course will specifically look at communication differences and disorders of special populations.

Prerequisites: Psychology 1013, 1023.  Recommended:  Psychology 3213.

Psychology 3803 – Health Psychology

This course focuses on the scientific and professional contributions of psychology to the promotion and maintenance of health.  Practical emphasis is placed upon the psychological care of people in institutional hospital care.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 3813 – Theories of Counselling Psychology

This course presents the concept of counselling as a process and introduces students to the various views, theories, models, and techniques that have been used to enhance this process.

Prerequisites: Psychology 1013, 1023 plus six additional credit hours in Psychology, or permission of the Registrar.

Psychology 3823 – Environmental Psychology

This course will update students about transactions between individuals and their physical settings.  In these transactions, individuals change the environment, and, in turn, the environment changes their behaviour and experiences.  Environmental Psychology includes theory, research, and practice aimed at making buildings more humane and improving our relationships with the natural environment.  Some issues that students will be informed about are environmental perception and cognition, environmental attitudes, personality and environment, personal space, territoriality, and crowding.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 3853 – Professional Practice and Ethics of Psychology

This course introduces students to basic helping and clinical skills, the ethics of professional practice in psychology, and various areas of specialization within the practice of psychology.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023 and 3603.

Psychology 3863* – Psychology of Religion

This course acquaints students with the fundamental elements needed to understand the role of religion in normal psychological functioning.  It includes the study of topics such as the construction of personal narratives; worldviews;  moral, ethical, and spiritual development; the formation of “god concepts”; and scriptual formation.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 3873 – Community Psychology

This course provides a systems perspective for the purpose of establishing community health or well-being.  Issues such as delivery of community services, tolerance toward minorities and ethnic groups, intervention for social problems, and effectiveness of community-based programs are included.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 2033 and 3603.

Psychology 3913 – History of Psychology

This course provides an examination of the historical and philosophical foundations of modern psychology.  This course will trace the development of psychology from its early philosophical roots to its present status as a behavioural science.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 2033; recommended for third or fourth year.

Psychology 3953 – Organizational Psychology

This course provides an examination of the branch of psychology that applies the principles of psychology to the workplace.  It will look at what affects behaviour within organizations and it will examine the impact of individuals, groups, and structure on how organizations perform.  This course is concerned with issues of leadership, job satisfaction, employee motivation, organizational communication, conflict management, organizational change, and group processes within an organization.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023.  (Students cannot receive credit for both PS3953 and BU3733.)

Psychology 4203 – Psychology of Prejudice

This course concentrates on the scientific study about what causes, maintains and lessens prejudice.  Topics covered include origin and maintenance of stereotypes and prejudice, racism and sexism, values and prejudice, cognitive components of prejudice, individual differences in prejudice, intergroup relations, stigma and identity, and the process of combating prejudice.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023, 2033, and 3603.

Psychology 4213 – Feminist Psychology

This unique course focuses on the psychology of women by integrating explanations from social, interpersonal, feminist, and behavioural perspectives.  Its spotlight will be on the research that expands current psychological theory concerning the lives of women, including such topics as women’s personality development, psychological factors affecting women’s achievement and career choices, work and family experiences and mental health status.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023, plus six additional credit hours in Psychology.

Psychology 4303 – Criminology

Criminological theory and criminal justice policy are examined as unique contexts for psychological practice and research.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013, 1023 plus six additional credit hours in Psychology.

Psychology 4513, 4523 – Advanced Directed Studies in Psychology

These courses are available for students when students interests and the professors’ expertise allow for a more in-depth tutorial approach.  Students must be highly capable and must have completed upper level prerequisite courses in the area of the directed study.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Registrar.

Psychology 4613 – Advanced Research Methods in Psychology

An addition to the previous research course providing students with awareness and involvement in accepted forms of experimental design, quantitative strategies, and data analysis.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 3603 and Mathematics 1233.

Psychology 4703* – Death and Grieving

This course examines the human response of grief when faced with the loss of a loved one.  Issues regarding attachment theory, normal grief, complicated grief as well as means for alleviating the pain associated with the loss are considered.

Prerequisites: Psychology 1013, 1023 plus six additional credit hours in Psychology.  Recommended:  Psychology 2233.

Psychology 4713* – Behaviour Disorders in Children and Adolescents

This course will involve a survey of emotional, behavioural, and social disorders in children and adolescents.  Specific topics in this area of study will include the history of the field, diagnostic classifications, theoretical approaches, and a survey of therapeutic interventions and service-delivery models.

Prerequisites: Psychology 1013, 1023 plus six additional credit hours in Psychology are required; Psychology 2213 or 2223 and 3703 are preferred.

Psychology 4733 – Gerontology

This course examines older adulthood from the perspective of developmental psychology.  It includes a survey of the scientific information on the psychosocial, physical, and cognitive status of individuals at this time in their development.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 1013/1023 plus six additional credit hours in Psychology are required.

Psychology 4743 – Drugs and Behaviour

This course will enable students to understand the effects of drugs on behaviour and to compare the major characteristics of psychoactive drugs, their physiological, psychological and societal effects to compare the patterns and causes of their use and abuse, and to compare the systems of drug education.  The perspective taken will be to provide accurate unbiased information about the use and effects of drugs on individuals and society.

Prerequisite:  Psychology 3603.

Psychology 4753 – Human Sexuality

This course will focus on the scientific and professional contributions of the understanding of human sexuality in psychological development and the maintenance of healthy, intimate relationships.  Professional emphasis will be placed upon the role of sex therapy in marriage counseling.

Psychology 1013, 1023.

Psychology 4853 – Practicum  in Psychology

A supervised practicum in a clinical, mental health, industrial, educational, or general health care setting involving a minimum of eight hours of work per week, plus a weekly class or individual meeting with the professor.  Opportunities will be given to develop case presentation skills necessary for most multi-disciplinary team settings.  Acceptance into this course is by the permission of the Registrar and is contingent on the availability of practicum placements.

Prerequisites:  Psychology 3813 or 3853.

Psychology 4996 – Thesis

Certain exceptional students, upon request prior to the completion of their third year, may be granted permission to write a thesis as an element to their Honours degree requirements.

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Info Sheet

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